Slug and Snail Resistant Plants

Slug Resistant Plants

Broccoli is NOT on the resistant plant list – Good Grief!

The plants you select for your garden can have a great impact on how much trouble you will have with slugs and snails. Start off with plants that resist the little slimers and you will save yourself years of trouble.

Slugs and snails love tender, succulent leaves so choosing plants with leathery, stiff or aromatic leaves can really lessen the trouble you will have. Next time you’re at the garden center why not save yourself the heartache and choose from the list below?

Most woody plants and ornamental grasses are quite resistant.

Astilbe Light and airy flower clusters,  1-3 ft. plants for shady perennial borders.

Baby’s Tears Soleirolia, a delicate creeping groundcover 2-4 inches high. Golden and varegated varieties are available.

Bedding Begonias Used most often as annual bedding plants, prefers light shade, a long-flowering charmer with succulent looking leaves in greens and reds.

Bamboo Clumping and running varieties from 3-50 ft. tall. A grove of large bamboo is a beautiful sight but even underground barriers may fail to contain running varieties.

Banana, cold hardy Large leaves up to 6 ft. long add a touch of the tropics to your yard. Smaller varieties can be grown in containers and brought in each autunm.

Bleeding Heart Graceful fern-like foliage, partial or full shade with heart shaped flowers, often in pink or rose. Perennial 1-3 ft. tall.

California poppy Yellow or orange flower above divided, dusty-looking foliage. Used as a Summer annual in colder areas. Weedy looking in the Summer but good for naturalizing.

Campanula ’Bellflower”  Most are spreading perennials. Many varieties and flower colors. Prefers partial shade.

Coral Bells Heuchera, Evergreen clumps of lobed leaves. Many grown for colorful foliage in reds and yellows. Prefer afternoon shade.

Crocosmia Sword shaped leaves form clumps. Bright red or orange flowers are attractive to hummingbirds.

Cyclamen Forms low,  perrenial clumps of attractive leaves with pink or rose flowers above.  C. hederiflolium is a vigorous and hardy variety. Full sun or partial shade.

Epimedium Forms a slowly spreading clump of leathery heart shaped leaves.6-9 inches high. Prefers partial shade but will tolerate dense shade. Spikes of flowers in the spring.

Euphorbias ‘Spurge’ Varieties from low mounds to small shrubs, all have toxic sap. “Mole Plant” is one variety.

Ferns Varieties are avaiable from 4″ to 50 ft. in the tropics. Grown for beautiful foliage in green or reddish hues. Partial or full shade.

Foxglove Tall spires of tube shaped flowers rise over clumps of hairyleaves. Attracts hummingbirds. Biennial, so it flowers the second year. Moist soil, shade to sun.

Fuchsias

Sweet woodruff

Salal

Geraniums

Grasses, ornamental

Hedychium

Hellebores

Hydrangeas

Impatients

Ivy

Japanese anemones

Juniper and other evergreens

Lady’s mantle

Lantana

Lavender

Linnaea

Lobelia

London Pride

Mints

Mock Strawberry

Nandina

Nasturtiums

Oxalis oregana

Penstemon

Phlox

Rhododendron

Rosemary

Roses

Sage

Sanseveria

Sedums

Sempervivum

False Soloman’s seal

Taxus

Creeping Thyme

Veronica

Vinca

Viola

Yucca

 

 

Favorite Plants of Slugs and Snails

Basil

Beans

Begonias, Tuberous

Cabbage

Canna lillies

Coleus

Dahlia

Delphinium

Gentian, Autumn flowering

Hostas

Lettuce

Lillies

Marigolds

Mustards

Primrose

Strawberries (the fruit, not the plants)

Turnip seedlings

 

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